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  • October 8, 2020

    What Factors Affect The Cost of Animation?

    As a buyer looking to get a new animated video production for your company, when browsing online you can see such a variety of animation costs, from £150 (uh oh!) to £20,000+ (eek!)

    Here are a few reasons why the price of animated video can range so much, and how to make an informed choice when it comes to specifying the work.

    Length of video

    A longer animation means more work. For example, A two-minute video literally has twice as many scenes as one minute video, and they need creating, and then animating.

    There are not that many economies of scale, as the work is usually bespoke to each project. Sometimes if you have a video series, some savings can be made through the series, but within one video, and your first video perhaps, nope.

    Being concise with your words in the script is integral to making sure you don’t waste money here.

    A long storyboard for animated video production

    This storyboard is about 2.5 min video. Which is slightly on the long side for an Explainer type web video. You can see just how much work and frames that needs. A shorter video could be half these number of frames. 

    Inclusion of 3D Animation

    3D animation can pop up in 2D animated videos quite often, and to the inexperienced, it can be undetected. Not seeing the line between 2D and 3D is fine if you’ve not even noticed, it wants to blend in seamlessly.

    Including 3D elements adds background and literally another dimension to the movement and view, so it adds more interest- instead of the same front on view you see so often with animation.

    It will often be composited and be the same design style, but it gives a variety to the scene, it’s not just flat facing.

    But all this means, additional specialised skills in 3D software, modelling and lighting, and then compositing – to make it look like the rest of 2D video.

    See the buildings in their video have been created in 3D space, allowing a camera to pass around as it rises. This is much more interesting than a generic pan up, with a completely straight-on looking street.

    Characters

    Including characters can add a much needed human touch to animation, which if you’re selling or teaching people can help dramatically.

    Using animated characters is a great way to act out scenarios and show a real user experience and convey emotion.

    However, to get them to move in an organic and realistic fashion – to be likeable takes time to draw, rig and animate.

    Low-end videos that have characters will move in a jerky/ stiff way or just not much movement at all. Or worse still, they stop dead for seconds at a time…

    It kind of defeats the purpose, as you lose a lot of the human connection and relatability.

    Character Design for animation

    Illustration style

    A 2D flat colour video using vector simple shapes, most likely, will take a much less time to design and animate than a hand-drawn, and highly textured frame developed in Photoshop or Procreate, as two extreme examples.

    Sometimes it’s difficult to talk about drawing and illustration, so here are a few styles, to show what I mean.

    You can see the difference between these few images, they show a clear difference in the work and time that went into them.

    The 2 on the top are much more detailed, one including natural textures and use of sading and light, the other using 3D to create a complex layout, compared to the bottom 2 that are more simple in nature and are line illustration or solid colour. 

    Textured Design for Animation
    Why pick animated explainer video over live action video
    Simple design in animation
    demo video

    And if a scene took longer to design, then you guessed it, it will more than likely need increased time to animate it. 

    The quality and style of the drawings will very much depend upon your story, who the audience is and what you want them to feel.

    Quality of Animation

    Again this is down to time, in general, the more time your animator spends, the better the quality of the final piece.

    A cheaper (quicker to produce) animation will generally be flat and move less, and there will be fewer scenes. And elements within scenes or whole scenes will be reused.

    A low budget animation will also have very basic transitions from scene to scene (one thing exits, and another enters). High-quality animations tend to have more thought out transitions so that the video flows more seamlessly.

    Reusing of assets, fewer scenes and fewer elements on screen at one time all saves time, and it may get the job done, but it won’t be exciting, it’s less relevant, and it’ll be less stimulating.

    So there is a balance to be struck. Most animation studios will be able to show or demonstrate a few levels of animation quality so that you can see the difference for yourself.

    Bespoke

    The cheaper sites offer template style make your own video, so you pick from some (often poorly) pre-designed and and pre-animated elements that you can pop together into a story.

    It’s cheap, but of course, it’s massively limited and who knows how many other people are using the same elements in their video?

    It’s also unlikely to fit with your brand very closely.

    And of course some lower-end studios will be using templates in their work without telling you.

    You can see a lot of the cost comes down to custom assets, length of video and time taken. So, in general, a higher cost animation is simply a higher quality product. Hopefully, this helps for next time you need an animated video for your business, and you can see what you’re paying for clearly.

     

    To see a range of animated explainer video styles head to our portfolio, or to read more about what we do and what goes into our work, see the animated video production page and if you have an idea you want to chat about, contact us!

  • August 22, 2020

    Why pick Animated Explainer Video over a Live-action Video

    Why pick Animated Explainer Video over a Live-action Video

    Both animation and live-action productions have their place as a marketing video for business, but live-action can be limited. 

    Let’s explore some of the reasons for choosing an animated explainer video over a standard filmed video for your next company video.

    Animated explainer video at its core is a catchy animated video generally under 2 mins long that explains something. It’s quite a vague term, but it covers most of the animated videos you see online in a broad way – and it’s much more diverse than you think. 

    Vidico

    Creativity

    Animation is creative and can be out if this world if you want. 

    Simply put, it can make you stand out and look unique.

    You can show an office one minute, then a street, then a person at home, then an international space station if you fancy! And it doesn’t cost more to do so. That is not even a particularly inspiring example of what can be done with animation. 

    As long as it serves the narrative, and suits the tone of the video, relates with your audience, your options are limitless. 

    With a live-action video, sure you can film several locations, but time and costs add up if it’s very expansive in terms of content. Most corporate videos are quite straight forward, 1-2 locations and that’s it. 

    With the limitless nature of motion design, you can say and show a lot in a very short time.

    Buck

    Versatility

    Explainers videos are a lot more versatile in style than you would think. It’s just icon sequences any more. 

    Most companies pick their general corporate branding the first time they go into animation and probably choose a flat 2D design and icon for the illustration style.

    It’s a safe (albeit potentially boring) bet.

    But many more experienced brands will experiment with style and tone to fit each campaign.

    When you draw each frame from scratch, you have ultimate flexibility. 

    Animation and illustration design can achieve very fun, or serious tone as needed. This gives you the adaptability to target new audiences, or to bring out different emotions. 

    A hand-drawn animation style will usually give a friendly caring vibe, while sharp lines and angles can be more formal and business-like.

    An experienced design studio can use these kinds of devices to tailor the look and feel of the animation to achieve exactly the vibe you want.

    And it’s not just reserved for consumer-based brands like Cola. Even a B2B business is selling to people at the end of the day.

    Giant Ant

    Duration of use

    Your animation way is less likely to go out of date so quickly.

    Usually, in explainer videos, any numerical figures that are referenced are not exact; for example, any charts or data you see, and any UI screens are often redesigned to simplify to look and flow. Of course, people are all fictional, unless exactly specified to copy someone.

    So, because the video’s not showing such exact information, it’s likely to last longer. 

    With a filmed video you can run into issues much quicker. For example, if staff leave who had been interviewed, you may need to edit them out of the video, which costs for the work and can leave holes in the content.

    And so you need to organise a reshoot, or the video needs more context to explain, which kind of defeats the point. 

    Or if the premises or signage are updated, you’ll feel that the video is old fashioned. 

    This happens way more often than you think!

    ILLO

    Control

    You have complete control with the look and feel of animation.

    Sometimes on a filming day, things can just crop up… the weather is terrible, an area is closed, your piece to the camera could have been delivered better, a colleague was unwell.

    And even if you have a sketched storyboard for a filmed video (but plenty of studios don’t offer this), it’s hard to know what each shot will look like.

    There’s always a bit of figuring out on the shoot day… a small element of winging it. Obviously a professional will still do a good job though!

    With animation, you have exact control over every scene, in advance of animation.

    You’ve seen (hopefully) a written treatment, possibly sketches, style frames, an illustrated storyboard, boardomatic, animatic, then the final animation.

    That’s a lot of stages to get your feedback in!

    The Furrow

    Sensitive topics

    If you need to talk about a sensitive topic, an animated explainer is a very good route to pick.

    Animation gives anonymity to the subject (I mean a person here) and gives you the freedom to really explore a subject matter or tough topic without making anyone vulnerable or a target. There is no risk of exposure.

    Using animation for a good cause can really amplify your message, for campaigns about for children or those in need, it can be a vital tool.

    Emanuele Colombo

    Price?

    It’s not necessarily cheaper. Drawing every frame, animating takes time.

    But reiterating from the points above, the animation may last longer, and it can be more tailored to your goals.

    Unless you have a lot of VFX in your live-action production, maybe for a high-end TV advert, filmed video is often the same cost or cheaper than explainer animation, but we can see it’s more limited unless it’s very high concept.

    Saying that… there are generally a few varying price levels of animation (this will vary from studio to studio), so if budget is tight, it’s not impossible.

    But generally, the more you spend, its more time you’re paying for, and therefore a higher quality animation – it’s more immersive and mesmerising. And thus a better storytelling device.

    oddfellows

    Hopefully, these points will help show you that there’s never been a better time to get on board with explainer animation for your business.

    Or at least give you food for thought before you jump onto creating a new corporate video for your business.

    The options available are a lot wider than you would imagine. 

    To see a range of animated explainer video styles head to our video portfolio, or if you wanted to read more about animated video production in general, or if you have an idea you want to chat about contact us

  • December 16, 2019

    Design in Animated video – the key to success

    Design in Animated video – the key to success

    Motion graphics are becoming more popular – many businesses are starting to learn the term when it comes to animated video, but in practice, the ‘graphics’ part is often lacking.

    Often when a business is discussing creating a new video, they talk about the animation and the scenes, but often the conversation about the design style and illustration isn’t there. It’s overlooked and taken for granted as it’ll just appear and look good. 

    The first brief is often ‘explainer video, maybe with my site icons’, but that’s so vague and samey, will that be the best route to tell your business message? An explainer video can be so much more than that. 

    An original design concept with bespoke illustrations can lift the animation and be so much more impactful – which has a real effect on video engagement.

     

    Bespoke illustrations and design for video

    But talking about design is sometimes difficult for clients – they don’t know where to look for references, and they may not be able to articulate what they like. But this is where creative studios need to have the knowledge to guide them properly.

    There is a lot to consider with design – it’s all about the relation to your target audience. In essence, the design will help show them how to feel, and what information is most important.

    An animated video for 20s aged entrepreneurs needs to look and feel quite different from a video for internal communication purposes.

    The video is also representing the brand – so it needs to look right. You may choose for it to fit in with your other branding materials or may decide to create a new campaign, or it can be stand-alone. Either is fine, but it needs to be a considered choice.

    Making the video match your branding precisely as an automatic response without thought, can be restricting and potentially bland.

     

    Motion Design using photos

     

    Design in video needs to achieve a few things:

     

    • Clearly communicate the story
    • Have the right tone
    • Align with the brand
    • Be cohesive
    • Be unique

     

     

    Picking a design-forward studio

    A video studio with a dedicated designer is an excellent place to start. Often at less experienced production houses, the role is lumped in together with the animator. While very few can be great at both, in general, it means they’re mediocre at both tasks.

    If they can’t draw, they may be reliant on stock vector images. Meaning the look can change from scene to scene unintentionally, as the vectors are from all different sources (affecting the tone), and it will probably have the same 2D flat graphic look we see so often.

    Because they’re buying in assets, the video may also not be that unique.

    A scene designed to show a negative.
    It’s mixed, and overall has a gloomy, slightly confusing tone

    A dedicated studio motion designer or illustrator will have background artistic knowledge, for example of the significance of colours, tones, value, shapes and textures. The use of these seemingly simple things can change the mood or feeling of a video massively. 

    Unbalanced design layouts or colours with no visual hierarchy, especially where any text is involved, can leave the audience missing the point. 

    Your animation studio will know when and how to use characters – do you need a key person who tells the story, background people, are we personifying objects? 

    Custom animated characters can increase the video bill, sometimes by more than you think, but in the right video, it’ll add so much more in the long term. 

    A creative animation team with the background of business and a professional illustrator or designer can make reliable recommendations for these points.

    A few characters

    Motion design-led workflow

    It starts with research about the business at hand, the audience, a look at competitors and any visual references the client likes. 

    This study will help inform and is combined with Art Direction – usually from the design lead or creative director. Art direction is often not spoken about at all in business video, especially at the low to mid-end cost range. In simple terms, they create the entire concept of the video. 

    The research and art direction helps give the creative studio a full picture of the target. Then all design and motion can be aimed towards this target. 

    It continues through pre-production with style frames. These are a few fully illustrated images from the storyboard that show the intention of colour, typography and layouts styles. 

    A high-end creative studio or a more significant budget animation may even produce 2 – 3 different image concepts to review – giving the client full information and choice. 

    The client can make sure it aligns with their ideas and goals before the studio has gone too far – as changes later down the line are always more costly. 

    They may also show a full sketched out storyboard, so the business can see the broad story before full design even starts.

    Illustrated Storyboard Design

    Illustrated Storyboard

    Methodology

    After dialogue and approval of the initial concept, frames and ideas, a design-led creative studio will produce the fully illustrated storyboard, complete with extra notes about scene movement and feeling.

    Leaving the design to chance, is very risky and means the video may not be what you expected, or want, at all. So any savings made on cost at the start, are turned into a loss.

    This method, with rigorous pre-production and client involvement, means that the animator has a clear idea of the flow, and can focus solely on making it move seamlessly. 

    The result is reliable, as you’ve already seen various illustration stages and it’s exciting, as it’s a bespoke video with a well-thought concept. 

    If a studio doesn’t offer any interim approval stages for video design, put, you are risking your time and money. 

    And next time if you want ‘an explainer video’ talk to the studio about different creative options available to you – it’s a lot more versatile than you may think. 

    You don’t want to end up with the same kind of animation video you see everywhere and fade into the sea of boring corporate videos. 

    And if you don’t have a clear idea, it should be up to them to guide you correctly – and show you what can be done. 

    If you want any help with video design, check out our video portfolio for style and animation ideas, or our animated video production page and send us a message!

    Related Portfolio Case Studies

  • March 23, 2018

    Essentials Of A Well-Structured Video

    When discussing the structure of a video, first determine goals. Without goals, your video lacks not only unity, but also credibility. In order to maintain your reputation, have a look at how to execute a well-structured video. This process is suitable for any occasion. Congruently, it will make sense to your viewers and satisfy your business needs.

    Setting goals requires sitting down and asking a few questions before anything is put into motion. So go ahead, sit down, and consider the following questions.

    Question before action

    What vision do you have for your video?

    If you can’t spell out what you want your video to accomplish, then you’d better so some mental pruning and find the seed you want to plant. Without vision, all your efforts might be in vain. Do not underestimate the influence vision can have on a video of any sort.

    Do you want to inspire or create a call to action?

    Knowing the outcome of your video will provide a nice template onto which key aspects can be inserted. Building a video is much deeper than having one idea. It’s layering, overlapping, and blending in order to achieve the desired goal.

    These are just a few questions to address. But when you finally decide to create a video or hire a professional to help you, be sure you lay out your vision/mood board as the guiding force behind everything. Whether your goal is a youtube video or a business marketing promotional clip, take the time to access your goals.

    Focus

    One thing to keep in mind is focus. Use the following tips as another set of rules to include in your video building strategy:
    Focus: remember the purpose of your video and how it will serve your audience.
    Focus: don’t ramble or spend ages getting to the first point; the goal is to capture attention and not lose it.
    Focus: have a well-written script that addresses the goal and your audience.

    Pre-introduction

    Before any attention grabbing tactic is put into play, you need to know why this video matters to your audience. In this regard, you must know your audience like the back of your hand. If you have not invested time in studying your audience, you’re doing yourself a disservice.  And you could be losing value audience members without even realizing it.

    Why should should your audience watch matters, it matters a lot.  If you think making a video without a clearly defined point, then you’re mistaken. While videos with artistic liberties can get away with this, the video you’re aiming for it much more goal-oriented. Once you know why they should watch, you can find a hook.

    Introduction

    This will set up the entire video. Here is where the audience will be lured in with a hook. Insert questions, statistics, interesting fact, and anecdotes to appeal to their curiosities. Once you have their attention, you can then provide them with the principle idea.

    In offering the main idea to your audience, know that you’re setting the up for a journey into your world. Have a clear map of where you want to go and tell your audience about the journey before you take the first step. A transparent purpose will give the audience a reason to stay and it will give your video plenty of reliability.

    Transitions

    Moving from one idea or image to the next might not sound so complicated, but when your mission has been drawn out, then every idea and image much correlate. And that’s where it gets a little tricky.

    Transitions help bind one idea to the next and they do so in a seamless fashion. They are the links that take you from one finished thought into the next one. Set these up well and you’ll have audience members excited to see what comes next.

    Body

    You’ve told your audience what you’re going to focus on, right. So now comes the bulk of the video. Here is where the main points will be featured and supported by facts, studies, or outcomes.

    For example, you want to make a video on combating fatigue or low energy levels. You can ask your audience in the beginning, Are you tired of being tired? And respond by saying, Have you considered rest, meditation/mindfulness, water, eating better, sleep. Those solutions become the body of your video, the focal point.

    Another example is for selling a produce. Let’s say you want to sell a phone service. You could ask, What is it you want in a mobile carrier?  And then reel them in with, We’ve got what you want, we offer abc & xyz. In the body of your video, you will narrow in on those key points in greater detail.

    Pre-close

    Just before you finish, it’d be nice to reiterate what you’ve already said in a sentence or two. This will bring your point home and remind viewers why they started watching in the first place. Repetition is another technique that has been proven to increase memory and make information easier to recall. Some might call this space the closer, it’s where you wrap up the sales pitch and wait for your audience to buy what you’re selling. This is a powerful tool for building integrity. It also packs a punch for lasting effects.

    Closing

    Technically, you’ve closed the video, however you still have a tiny space where you can make a huge difference. Most will stop at the pre-closer and think that’s enough, they will even consider the pre-closer sufficient, but without leaving your viewers with a call to action or any motivation, you’re sort of left them sitting there, wondering, waiting, and without any mission.

    You want to leave your viewers with that final impact and here’s the time to do it. It doesn’t have to be more than a few second, but it should be huge in scope. Don’t let your audience walk away from your video without doing, thinking, or feeling something. That’s the secret ingredient and that’s what will make your video stand out in the midst of all the videos out there on the internet. Get remembered out with a stellar closing, one that your audience isn’t soon to forget.

  • March 30, 2017

    9 Tips for Finding a Video Freelancer you can trust

    As an agency or studio, hiring a loyal video freelancer is a great way to expand business capacity and add skillsets to your team at a low cost.

     

    When you do find a good freelancer, or freelance team, it can seriously boost your game. Having someone you can really trust to deliver high quality video or design work, without the hassle of paying for their downtime is invaluable.

     

    There are so many highly competent, talented video contractors, who know the business inside out – so how do you find the right one for you?

     

    Here are 9 tips for finding a freelancer you can really trust to help grow your business

    1. Get recommendations from other agencies or studios you know

    Word of mouth is still a great way of finding good people. Ask people you trust, to see who they trust. This is the best place to start if you’re unsure.

    2. Put your job on a specialist video / design job site

    This is a good start, as it weeds out more of the non-professionals straight away. Often when adding a job to a generic site, especially one with no login for freelancers, you will receive so many replies of such varying quality, it can be daunting to go through them all to get rid of those who are not suitable. Picking a website like motionographer, filmandtvpro, or ifyoucouldjobs will give you a better calibre of applicants. 

    3. Look at a number of previous jobs

    Go much further than just the 2-3 videos they send upon applications, you’re looking for consistent quality. If you have a quick look at up to 10 (maybe more!) videos, you can see if the quality drops and they don’t always have the standard you need. And you know with that many videos, they are working regularly. This will also help you gauge properly if their style suits your needs.

    4. Find out what role they played in each video

    Often a contractor will only have been involved in 1 part of a video, for example – they did the motion design or just the animation. If it’s not obvious from any accompanying text (which it really should be), ask them what they did. You don’t want to hire someone you think does animation and design, but you find out they’ve exaggerated their animation capabilities.

    5. Speak to their previous clients

    If you have found someone who is potentially good fit, they wont mind if you request to speak to a previous client. Ask them about the full process end to end. Were they easily contactable? Did they deliver on time? Were there any unexpected costs? Did anything go really well / or badly? Did they work on more than 1 production?

    6. Locality doesn’t matter

    Initially you may be looking for someone to come into your studio, or at least be quite close. But this isn’t always necessary. Local can be often be very expensive , or not high enough quality. For example, freelancers in London can be more expensive, purely because of where they are.

    As long as the timezone isn’t too different – say less than 7 hours – you can have clear remote working relationships. You really don’t need to stay within your country, though you may feel more comfortable. Some of our best clients are based in the USA, we have a great communication, simply with skype and email.

    7. Have an introductory meeting

    You may be in a rush to get work done – so there’s no time for an intro. But a short meeting just to introduce both yourselves is vital to start gaining trust in the relationship, it only takes 20-30 mins to have a good chat and judge if they’d be a good fit for you, and vice versa.
    This can be in person or using a video chat online does fine these days too. It will allow you fully gauge what they’re like – are they approachable, do they seem honest? These qualities are just as important as their work.

    8. Collect a list

    When a big video production comes in and you have to pull out all the stops. You need a handy list of good animators or designers you can turn to for quick reliable turnaround – so you don’t waste essential time.

    So, if someone writes to you – they have a great portfolio, the price is reasonable and they seem capable, but it’s not the right moment, find some way of saving their email or contact details. you’ll thank yourself later when you’re in a rush!

    9. Plan your jobs / specifications well

    Once you’ve decided to hire a freelancer for job – they need a solid brief. Freelancers are usually smart, and intuitive – it comes with the turf. But they need a good clear plan to work to, if you leave it too vague and they get the wrong idea – you’ve all wasted your time when the client isn’t happy.

     

    Give them as much guidance as you can to begin with, the initial briefing with any job is very important. They will use all that going forward. It’s often a good idea to go through the script or storyboard, and make sure each section makes sense. 

    These days it is so easy to find a video freelancer online, so go ahead! These tips should help you sort through and find the perfect match for your company. To see examples of our work head to our video portfolio or animated video production page.

    And if you need a hand in your studio – contact us! We work for some great video and marketing agencies worldwide and offer a robust white label video and animation service.

  • March 6, 2017

    12 Stunning Examples of Animation for a Good Cause

    The use of animation or motion graphics is a great tool in documentary style videos, or those with a strong message to tell. It ables us to show sensitive subjects without filming and putting anyone at risk at being shown. This is quite often the case with videos produced for a cause, they can be tough to film because of the strong content of the video, or because of geographical / legal restrictions.

    Animation gets over this hurdle, and can explain complex and difficult concepts easily, simplifying them for a global audience to comprehend and want to take action. And shown below, you can still tell a strong heartfelt message with just moving images.

    Here’s a round up of some of the best recent animations for causes and charities, highlighting some of the major issues to be addressed worldwide.

    100 Years of Planned Parenthood

    Kirsten Lepore

    The New Promised Land. Chapter 1

    MiraRuido

    Why Water

    Buck

    Pathway Through Care

    Wonderlust | Anchor Point Animation

    Republic of Kiribati, a climate change victim

    Lucca Geuna Jounou

    Trapped with Abuse - End Male Guardianship in Saudi Arabia

    Anchor Point Animation

    WWF | Water Stewardship

    Nice and Serious

    Unicef: Unfairy Tales

    180LA

    Don’t be a bully, loser.

    Emanuele Colombo

    USAID Conference - Amazon Rainforest

    Ignacio Florez & Adriana Ogarrio

    Health Systems Leapfrogging In Emerging Economies

    Lonelyleap Ltd

    Greenpeace ‘Ecosystem’

    Georgetown Post

    You can see that although there are similarities between the videos, there are many different ways to approach this kind of heavy-hitting animation.

    A more hand-drawn or handcrafted approach can bring motion graphics video away from a very corporate look, which often isn’t appropriate or relatable for videos for a cause. So video design is quite important here. While a voiceover from someone directly involved (where possible) can also invoke a lot of emotion in the story and boost the message. There are so many options, it all depends on the content, and who you’re aiming at to watch it.

    If you’re a charity, or you want us to tell your message for a good cause with animation, we’d love to help you. You can read more about our Charity Video Production Services here

  • January 23, 2017

    Captions in Web Video – A Quick Guide to maximise your message

    Browsing online we’re seeing more and more videos showing with captions – what’s this all about?

     

    This is due to the rise of mobile video which is growing massively, recent research shows mobile video views grew 6x faster than desktop views in 2015. (Invodo, 2016)

     

    One of the main problems for marketers is that mobile users may not always have the sound turned on – or want to turn it on. So although the visual message may come across – crucially half of the video could be missing.

     

    So how do you get your message across if your video is voiceover or interview-based? This is the same issue, whether filmed or animated video production.

     

    Captions are a great way of letting people preview the video content, and letting them decide to watch with the volume turned on. Or letting them take on board the full message when the volume isn’t an option.

    Making the assumption people will always listen from the start is a mistake.

     

    However, sometimes you may not want or need captions, and it’s not always straightforward.

     

    3 Main Types of Captions

     

    Animated Captions – inbuilt into the video that just show highlights and keywords

    Open Captions – like subtitles but can’t be turned on and off – they’re embedded within the video

    Closed Captions – abilities to turn the subtitles on and off, set by the video player.

     

    Social Video

     

    If your marketing is very social media-based, for example, Facebook adverts, (and who would blame you!) 100 million hours of video per day are watched on Facebook. (Tech Crunch, 2016) There can be a lot of silent video playback, so you’ll want to incorporate full sub captions, or make your visuals very self-explanatory. The latter is only really possible with animation or motion graphics based videos. 

     

    And so now more often on Facebook and youtube, we do see full sub captions are being used. Which means people can still get the content, but without having to turn the sound up –  it’s a great user-focused approach.

     

    For those heavily invested in social video, Open captions are a great option, as it gives you more flexibility with the design than video player generated closed captions.

     

    This means your video will never show without captions by mistake, the full message will always get across.  

    Example of Open Captions from AJ+

    Obviously they still need to be clear, so you can’t be crazy with font choice or colour, but you can be sure they don’t overlap with any visuals, the font is suitable, and you have full control of the process.

     

    If you’re still dabbling with social video production – then Closed Caption system is a great way to start and increase engagement.

     

    Website video

    For your website, you may not need full subcaptions. If your service or product is heavily B2B – you may still have a good majority of desktop users, who have access to speakers or headphones more easily.

     

    So for a website video or a video just for presentations, you may find that a few key highlight messages, animated nicely do the trick along with the voiceover.

    The best to way to find out if your visitors are coming by mobile, tablet or desktop, is to check your wenbsite analytics for the screen size and device used most frequently. You can also check the time on page – to see if you’re putting off mobile users with your site.

    There are a few downfalls

     

    It can take a bit of effort and knowledge required to produce the right files for Closed Captions – it requires generating an SRT (or similar)  file, which is basically a text file of the script that is formatted so that each line is associated with a time code – so if you’re not familiar it can be a little daunting and time consuming.

     

    Facebook and Youtube now offer automatically generated captions – woohoo! But sometimes what it hears is incorrect, so this is not a foolproof method. Especially when you’ve spent time and money producing a video to generate sales (imagine loads of a typos in a proposal!).  

    Here’s a quick example where I have put Youtube Closed Captions on a preexisting video. You can see the client didn’t plan to have this, as the captions over overlap the animated text somewhat. And Youtube initially did quite a bad job of guessing the captions! So, it’s not always straightforward.

    If you’re not up for a DIY approach, You can hire companies to easily make a perfect transcript if you’re getting errors, then upload that SRT file to youtube or facebook.

     

    If you choose to have animated captions that are ever present and part of the video design – then it’s crucial they are timed well for those who are listening and match the voiceover – as hearing and seeing them as different messages will create a little confusion.

     

    This seems obvious, but marketers are still doing this! It’s so difficult to take one message fully on board if you’re hearing another.

    Getting started

     

    So to get started, first look at your analytics and your marketing efforts.  Is your audience website and desktop based or do you drive large amounts of traffic through social media and mobile?

     

    After you have a clear idea of your own users you can decide what level of captions to use.

     

    It’s good to know this info at the beginning of a video project, so that nothing is overlapping that area of the screen, or that the video producer can add animated highlight captions which capture the message in an elegant way.

     

    If you already have videos online on youtube or facebook – see if the automatically generated captions work for you – and there you go, you’ve already increased watching potential!

     

    In the meantime – check out our newly updated portofolio, and see a wide range of web videos with animated captions!

  • July 28, 2016

    New Showreel Release

    We’ve been so extremely busy this year so far, that it really called for a new Showreel to reflect our latest work. It’s amazing how quickly our most recent portfolio has built up in just a few months.

    We’ve been lucky to work with a range of fantastic creative agencies around the world, to produce soo many different kinds of video. Thank you everyone!

    Without further ado – here it is!

     

  • August 30, 2015

    Why Is it Worth Having a Video for Your Local Business

    For a local business – I understand a video production may seem like a big expense – and a bit daunting to go about if we’re honest. This is especially the case if your marketing is usually low key, such as a bit of local newspaper advertising – or you don’t advertise at all.

    But with any local business, competition can be quite fierce.

    And for a potential customer, on the surface, you may look quite similar to your competitors…

    unless the person enquiring makes the effort to come and actually visit you – which is when of course they see your value proposition and USPs.

    But you need to catch your potential visitors even before they plan a visit to your premises. How do you get more visits or more enquiry emails from potential customers?

    And how do you get more customers, who have already part made up their minds, by the time they’re talking to you?

    A video on your website gives you an instant edge and style.

    – for a lot of local SMEs, the popularity of marketing video still hasn’t quite caught on for the local sector – or not as much as with larger companies.

    It can be seen as a lot of effort to organise and with unknown results – but working with professional – this fear is mostly unfounded.

    Online video has proven over and over again to have a good ROI and impact on your website presence.

    Even so, these fears exist – so it’s still relatively new and exciting for small businesses to produce and feature a video online.

    It doesn’t need to be long, just 1-2 minutes will do to show the world what you’re about and why a potential customer should pick you.

    And of course, it should be professionally made – as a poor quality video, in terms of looks or content, can actually be detrimental to your online credibility!

    There’s the obvious use – put it on your homepage, but a video is also a multi-purpose marketing tool.

    As well as the website there’s your social media channels (you can upload directly to Facebook), upload to Youtube (which also boosts your website), any exhibitions, client meetings and more.

    There’s also the possibility to get low-cost re-edits, to produce different versions you may require, from just 1 video shoot.

    In a local marketplace – video is still not being fully used to its fullest extent – so get on board and show your potential customers quickly and with style – why you’re the one for them.

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